Research & Publication

This page features the papers and articles I have presented and published in international and local conferences and publications. Complete or portions of papers I have written/ am writing can also be read under the Current Research Projects page.

Most of my works are published in open access databases and publications for I firmly believe that knowledge should be shared. It should never be monopolized by those who have the privileges to access information. It should be democratically accessible by those who need it. 

My only hope is that you cite my name if you wish to include some of my work in your own paper. I would be glad even if you send me an email (nguinto@slsu.edu.ph) when you find some of my work helpful in yours. 

You may click on the links to access either the full paper or samples thereof. Thanks for dropping by!



Current Research Projects

  • Approaching Cultural Differences in the Assessment of Students’ English Compositions The ASEAN Integration promises fluidity in scholarship and economic opportunities, among others, between and among its constituent nations. The Philippines, arguably being the center of English language training in the ...
    Posted Nov 15, 2016, 1:07 AM by Nicky Guinto
  • Composition Errors of Second Year Engineering Students of SLSU: Description and Pedagogical Implications This exploratory research paper attempted to determine the nature, causes, and instructional relevance of composition errors in a corpus of 35 compositions written by second year Engineering students of SLSU ...
    Posted Nov 15, 2016, 1:06 AM by Nicky Guinto
  • Linguistic Landscapes and the Concept of Public Space* Research on Linguistic landscape (LL) has opened wide doors for social researchers to describe and study the politics of language use and multilingualism within specific physical environments (Gorter, 2006; Lin ...
    Posted Nov 1, 2014, 11:25 AM by Nicky Guinto
Showing posts 1 - 3 of 3. View more »



WORKS PRESENTED AND/OR PUBLISHED


Refereed Journals

Guinto, N. L.. (2016). Composition Errors of Second Year Engineering Students of SLSU: Description and Pedagogical Implications. Tilamsik, 8(2). Retrieved from http://ejournals.ph/form/cite.php?id=9990

This exploratory research paper attempted to determine the nature, causes, and instructional relevance of composition errors in a corpus of 35 compositions written by second year Engineering students of SLSU, A.Y. 2012-2013. Analyzed in reference to the Error Analysis Framework of SP Corder and Jack Richards, results revealed that seven kinds of errors were commonly found in the corpus. The seven frequently occurring errors include errors in tense sequence, word substitution, embedding, preposition substitution, spelling, and article insertion and deletion. These errors are results of over-generalization, false concept about the rule, and ignorance to rule restrictions, and are representations of the learners’ idiosyncratic dialect or interlanguage. Hence, correction of errors in tense sequence, word substitution, and embedding must be given emphasis in class discussions. Errors in preposition substitution, spelling, and article insertion and deletion may be corrected when pedagogical focus calls for discussion of such concepts.

Guinto, N. L. (2015b). Approaching Cultural Differences in the Assessment of Students’ English Compositions. MINSCAT, EDS Business School and TUCST Research Journal 2(2).

The ASEAN Integration promises fluidity in scholarship and economic opportunities, among others, between and among its constituent nations. The Philippines, arguably being the center of English language training in the region, can expect more foreign students coming in to study English. With more foreign students expected to arrive not only to learn how to speak, but more importantly write in the English language, differences in culture, and therefore writing style, may pose as a problem for local teachers when it is time to assess their students’ written output. Thus, this paper addresses the problem of assessing students’ writing in the light of recent studies in language such as in World Englishes and ESL/EFL (English as a Second/ Foreign Language) writing instruction. Recent innovations in ESL writing instruction were synthesized to see how culture, in theory, should be treated in giving feedback in the classroom. It was found that studies on writing in the ESL/EFL contexts push for a more culturally-sensitive treatment of student outputs by adopting what Kubota and Lehner (2004) called “multiplicity of rhetoric” in assessment. Teachers of English composition writing therefore, should not reduce writing instruction to mere dichotomies of right and wrong; instead, they must determine why a particular student writes the “wrong” way and be open to the potential of “gray areas” in the process.

Guinto, N. L. (2015). Defying Orthodoxy: A Critique on the Distinctive Features Theory of Trubetzkoy, Jakobson and ChomskyTilamsik: Journal of Research of the Southern Luzon State University College of Arts and Sciences 8(1). 204-208. 

The century that transpired bore witness to the rapid and rigid shift in the study of human language, essentially initiated by the ground-breaking lecture of Ferdinand de Saussure published posthumously by his students in 1916. Agreements, contradictions, inspirations, and disappointments fuelled the vehicle of greater explorations in the field, exhausting every possibility and opportunity to discover the underlying principles behind the intricate architecture of human language. In this case, the phonological system of language is indeed not an exception. 

Guinto, N. L. (2014). Segmental features of English modeled by selected professors in a state university in the Philippines: Implications in teaching EnglishInternational Journal of Research Studies in Language Learning 3(1). 67-80. DOI: 10.5861/ijrsll.2013.475

This paper is a case study that identified the segmental features observable among and modeled by three professors in a state university in the Philippines (where Tagalog is the native language), in their reading of a poem. In reference to General American English (GAE) which Filipino speakers of English attempt to approximate, generalizations out of the data and pedagogical implications were offered. The sociolectal approach in describing phonological features of a particular speech community was employed in this paper. Results revealed that substitution, addition and deletion of sound segments are governed by the interference of L1 and caused by the fossilization of pronunciation “lapses” of the participants. These lapses can therefore be regarded as defining features of the variety of English spoken by speakers in the area and perhaps its neighboring provinces since the participants serve as models in the community. In view of this, teachers of English should strengthen the Communicative Competence Model in the teaching of the language in order to make students be sensitive and appreciative of varieties of English such as the one noted in this paper.
Click on the DOI to read the full paper.


Guinto, N. L. (2013). Ideological constructions in column titles by two age groups in the Philippines: Implications in language teaching and learningInternational Journal of Research Studies in Language Learning 2(5). 105-116. DOI: 10.5861/ijrsll.2013.372

This paper is an exploratory research which sought to discover ideological constructions in column titles by contributors of Philippine Daily Inquirer’s (PDI) Youngblood and Highblood columns. By unveiling ideological constructs in the title, certain pedagogical implications were reviewed on the premise that samples of these columns may have found their way in the education system as models of quality personal essay. Analysis was done through the examination of process types and lexicalization. Fairclaugh’s Critical Discourse Analysis and Halliday’s Process Types and lexicalization served as the theoretical foundations of the study. Data used in the analysis were those published in PDI’s website from October, 2011- October 2012. It was found that young and old contributors write about experiences pertaining to concrete actions, contradicting earlier studies on Filipino youth and the elderly. Moreover, lexical choices of young contributors point to themselves as being goal-oriented, adventure-driven, and assertive, yet weak, frustrated and dependent. Consequently, the elderly contributors portray themselves as energetic, politically- and socially-aware, wise, yet nostalgic, sickly, and age-conscious. Out of these results, implications to language teaching and learning are underscored.

Click on the DOI to read the full paper.


Research Conference Proceedings

Guinto, N. L. (2012b). Defying Rhetorical Orthodox: The Filipino Youth and the Structure of their Narrative Essays. Refereed Proceedings of the Annual Conference on Journalism and Mass Communications held at Hotel Fort Canning, Singapore on December 4-7, 2012. DOI: 10.5176/2301-3729_JMComm12.54

In the light of Swale’s Genre Analysis framework, this exploratory research was conceived to unveil the cognitive structuring of the Filipino youth’s narrative essays published in the Young Blood column of the Philippine Daily Inquirer. Twenty-nine columns out of 95 published ones from June-December, 2011 were found to be predominantly narrative and hence, were subjected to analysis in this paper. Results revealed that the Filipino youth write in a common rhetorical structure that is nearly related to standard western practices, attributable to existing influences of Anglo-American literary canons in the academe. However, the identified structure in the corpus of personal narrative essays proved that the notion of western supremacy in Philippine English writing is gradually losing ground. A unique identity in writing is defying western rhetorical orthodoxy in the country and it is spearheaded by no less than the Filipino youth. 

Keywords: rhetorical structure, Filipino youth, Genre Theory, Philippine English writing


Guinto, N. (2012a). Language of Youngblood: The Discourse Practice of Young Column Writers in the Philippiness. Paper presented at the 2nd Asian Conference in Language Learning, held at Ramada Osaka, Osaka, Japan on April 26-28,2012.

Inspired by youth empowerment posed by present social movements in the Philippines, this study attempted to discover the discourse practice of young column writers in the country. It specifically sought to describe the prevailing convention on Philippine Daily Inquirer’s Youngblood column with particular attention to target audience, title, word count, and discourse development, with an end view of determining the role that language plays in empowering the voice of the youth in the present domestic space. 

The Reflective Inquiry and Practice-focused methods in media discourse analysis were used in the study. Seven columns, published both in print and online, for 15 consecutive days (October 1-15, 2011), were identified and analyzed. The titles, target audience and word count of the columns were analyzed through Gricean Maxims, Flesch-Kincaid Formula, and traditional counting respectively. Discourse development was determined through the analysis of Cohesion (conjunctive and reiteration lexical cohesion), and Halliday’s systems of transitivity. 

After examining the texts, it was concluded that the target audience of young writers, whose column compose of more or less 1000 words, starts from high school students but are not necessarily limited to the age group. Narratives that deal with what the writers themselves are doing are preferred over other forms of writing as evidenced by the density of personal pronouns and verbs expressing material processes. This means that the younger generation in the Philippines use language as a means of expressing the fact that they are actually “doing something” worth noticing contrary to local elderly beliefs.


Paper Presentations

Guinto, N. & Villaverde, B. (2016). Writing Assessment in the Philippines: Challenges and Implications in the ASEAN Integration. Paper presented at the 5th Centre for Language Communication International Symposium, National University of Singapore, Singapore on May 25-27, 2016.

The ASEAN Integration promises fluidity in scholarship and economic opportunities, among others, between and among its constituent nations. The Philippines, arguably being the center of English language training in the region, can expect more foreign students coming in to study English. With more foreign students expected to arrive not only to learn how to speak, but more importantly write in the English language, differences in culture, and therefore writing style, may pose as a problem for local teachers when it is time to assess their students' written output. Informed by Canagarajah's (1999) Critical Pedagogy (CP) framework, this paper attempts to see how recent studies in language such as in World Englishes and ESL/EFL (English as a Second/ Foreign Language) writing instruction are translated into the practice of giving feedback in the writing classroom based on key teacher-informants and a focus student-group. Results show that in spite of recent studies on the Englishes and writing in the ESL/EFL contexts which push for a more culturally-sensitive treatment of student outputs, the practice of reducing writing instruction to mere dichotomies of right and wrong in reference to the more socially accepted variety of English is still strongly in place.


Guinto, N. (2014). “Puta! Masyadong technical ang gago!”: Negotiation of (Non)Academic Identity in, and the Transgressive Linguistic Landscape of, University Library Textbook Marginalia. Paper presented at the 12th Philippine Linguistics Congress held at the University of the Philippines-Diliman, Quezon City on November 26-28, 2014.

This paper examines marginalia in selected university library textbooks to reveal how students who have written in the margins negotiate their academic (and non-academic) identity(ies) in and through the textbook margins. In this paper, I situate library textbook margins in the realm of linguistic landscape (LL) and regard student marginalia as transgressive texts that occur within the academic community bound by rules against it. Secondly, I argue that the act of writing in margins of library books is an indication of the writers’ appropriation of space, a gesture of resistance to the rigid academic environment. This paper is generally grounded on Alastair Pennycook’s theory on transgression (2007) and employs the discourse analytic frameworks of stake, and Ervin Goffman’s concept of Footing (1981 cited by Goodwin and Goodwin, 2006). Based on the data analyzed, the students have transformed the institutionally-created public space into one that is reflective of their identities, both academic and non-academic through manifestations of language choice, use, and form in the marginalia found in the selected university library textbooks. Much of their academic identity are expressed through symbols, markings, corrections, comments and summaries they write on the pages of the textbooks, which are mostly in English. Their non-academic identity is mostly revealed through conversations containing profanities about and beyond the author’s writings, which are marked by the use of Filipino. 

See the Book of Abstracts for more information.


Guinto, N. (2013b). 
Categorical Analysis of Post-Graduate Research on English Studies 
in selected Universities and Colleges in Southern Luzon 
(2001-2011).
 Paper presented at the Joint International Conference of the  Philippine Association for Language Teaching (PALT) & Pan-Asian Consortium of Language Teaching Societies (PAC), held at the University of San Jose Recoletos, Cebu City on December 5-7, 2013.

This paper is a modest attempt to profile research efforts and directions on English studies in the post-graduate level in the last ten years in Southern Luzon, through a categorical analysis of annotated researches written from 2001 to 2011 and gathered from selected state-owned and private universities in the said region. It specifically aims to identify the strong areas as well as point out areas needing attention in the research efforts in the region. It similarly attempts to provide potential reasons as to why the resulting strong areas are valued more over others based on existing policies, 
realities and region-specific trends. A quota of 100 postgraduate theses was initially set, but only 95 were annotated due to the absence of postgraduate courses related to English studies in some Universities and Colleges, and because of the relatively few number of graduate students who actually graduate from the programs. Results indicate that research efforts in English language studies in Southern Luzon in the last ten years are centered around the teaching-learning process, particularly on instructional material development and learner strategies and motivation styles. Research direction in English language in Southern Luzon is strongly influenced by the needs of students, research policies of potential funding agencies, local HEI’s research policies, and graduate school faculty members’ priority areas.

Keywords: English studies, research trends, Southern Luzon, post-graduate research 


Guinto, N. (2013a). Language of Young Blood: The Discourse Practice of Young Column Contributors in the Philippines. Paper presented at the 1st College of Arts and Letters (CAL) Graduate Colloquium held at the University of the Philippines-Diliman, Quezon City on February 23, 2013.

This paper summarizes salient findings in two related exploratory studies I have done, which attempted to partially unveil the discourse practice in the Philippine Daily Inquirer’s Young Blood column. Particular attention is given to target audience, discourse development, and rhetorical structure with an end view of determining the role that language plays in empowering the voice of the youth in the present domestic space. The Reflective Inquiry and Practice-focused methods in media discourse analysis were used in the papers. Analyses were done through the aid of Flesch-Kincaid Formula, Halliday’s Cohesion (conjunctive and reiteration lexical cohesion) and systems of transitivity, as well as Swale’s Genre Analysis framework. Seven columns, published in October 2011, were purposively chosen to identify the target audience and discourse development. Meanwhile, 29 predominantly narrative ones, published from June to December, 2011, were purposively selected to identify the rhetorical structure preferred by the contributors. After examining the texts, results revealed that the target audience of young column contributors are their fellow youth but are not necessarily limited to that age group. Narratives that deal with what the contributors themselves are doing are preferred over other forms of writing as evidenced by the density of personal pronouns and verbs expressing material processes. These narratives were weaved in a slightly different pattern from conventional ones. This means that the younger generation in the Philippines use language as a means of asserting the fact that they are actually “doing something” worth noticing, expressed in a rhetorical pattern unique to their generation, contrary to local elderly beliefs.


Guinto, N. (2012b). Defying rhetorical orthodox: The Filipino youth and the structure of their narrative essays. Paper presented at the Annual International Conference on Journalism and Mass Communication, held at Hotel Fort Canning, Singapore on December 2-4, 2012.

In the light of Swale’s Genre Analysis framework, this exploratory research was conceived to unveil the cognitive structuring of the Filipino youth’s narrative essays published in the Young Blood column of the Philippine Daily Inquirer. Twenty-nine columns out of 95 published ones from June-December, 2011 were found to be predominantly narrative and hence, were subjected to analysis in this paper. Results revealed that the Filipino youth write in a common rhetorical structure that is nearly related to standard western practices, attributable to existing influences of Anglo-American literary canons in the academe. However, the identified structure in the corpus of personal narrative essays proved that the notion of western supremacy in Philippine English writing is gradually losing ground. A unique identity in writing is defying western rhetorical orthodoxy in the country and it is spearheaded by no less than the Filipino youth. 

Keywords: rhetorical structure, Filipino youth, Genre Theory, Philippine English writing

Guinto, N. (2012a). Language of Youngblood: The Discourse Practice of Young Column Writers in the Philippiness. Paper presented at the 2nd Asian Conference in Language Learning, held at Ramada Osaka, Osaka, Japan on April 26-28,2012.

Inspired by youth empowerment posed by present social movements in the Philippines, this study attempted to discover the discourse practice of young column writers in the country. It specifically sought to describe the prevailing convention on Philippine Daily Inquirer’s Youngblood column with particular attention to target audience, title, word count, and discourse development, with an end view of determining the role that language plays in empowering the voice of the youth in the present domestic space. 

The Reflective Inquiry and Practice-focused methods in media discourse analysis were used in the study. Seven columns, published both in print and online, for 15 consecutive days (October 1-15, 2011), were identified and analyzed. The titles, target audience and word count of the columns were analyzed through Gricean Maxims, Flesch-Kincaid Formula, and traditional counting respectively. Discourse development was determined through the analysis of Cohesion (conjunctive and reiteration lexical cohesion), and Halliday’s systems of transitivity. 

After examining the texts, it was concluded that the target audience of young writers, whose column compose of more or less 1000 words, starts from high school students but are not necessarily limited to the age group. Narratives that deal with what the writers themselves are doing are preferred over other forms of writing as evidenced by the density of personal pronouns and verbs expressing material processes. This means that the younger generation in the Philippines use language as a means of expressing the fact that they are actually “doing something” worth noticing contrary to local elderly beliefs.



Books

Guinto, N. & Manzanilla, S. (Eds) (2014). Writing in the professionsLucban, Philippines: Southern Luzon State University Department of Languages, Literature, and Humanities.

Dizon, J. & Guinto, N. (Eds.) (2013). Communication in the scientific and technical professionsLucban, Philippines: Southern Luzon State University Department of Languages, Literature, and Humanities.

Guinto, N. & Villaverde, B. (2012). Functional English in a global society 2. Lucban, Philippines: Southern Luzon State University Department of Languages, Literature, and Humanities.


Guinto, N. & Villaverde, B. (2011). Functional English in a global society 1. Lucban, Philippines: Southern Luzon State University Department of Languages, Literature, and Humanities.



Book Chapters


Guinto, N. (2013). "Introduction to Technical Studies." In Dizon, J. & Guinto, N. (Eds.), Communication in the scientific and technical professionsLucban, Philippines: Southern Luzon State University Department of Languages, Literature, and Humanities.


Newspaper Contributions


Guinto, N. L. (2012 Oct. 4). "Plagiarism." Philippine Daily Inquirer, 27(303). p. A13.

Guinto, N. L. (2012 Feb. 27). "How to teach English." Philippine Daily Inquirer, 27(81). pp. H1-2.